What Should I Ask My Doctor About Treatment Options?

It’s good to arrive at your appointment with an idea of the subjects you want to cover, including your condition, the treatment options available to you, and the pros and cons of each one. If your doctor is not familiar with the range of treatments for chronic pain, ask for a referral to a specialist.


Resources for Learning More About Spinal Cord Stimulation

If you plan to discuss spinal cord stimulation with your doctor it may be helpful to extend your understanding of the therapy and prepare some questions that you would like to discuss during your consultation. Below are some resources to help you prepare.

  • The British Pain Society is an independent medical professional body that publish recommendations as a guide for both patients and medical professionals.
  • The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is an independent organisation responsible for developing national guidance, standards and information for high-quality health and social care across England and Wales. Since November 2008, NICE have approved spinal cord stimulation for the treatment of neuropathic pain (TAG 159). This means that the NHS is legally obliged to fund and provide access to adults with chronic pain of neuropathic origin who:
    • Continue to experience chronic pain (measuring at least 50 mm on a 0–100 mm visual analogue scale) for at least 6 months despite appropriate conventional medical management, and
    • Have had a successful trial of stimulation as part of the assessment, and
    • Continue to experience chronic pain (measuring at least 50 mm on a 0–100 mm visual analogue scale) for at least 6 months despite appropriate conventional medical management

Find detailed information on the Technology Appraisal for the treatment of Chronic Neuropathic Pain with Spinal Cord Stimulation

Find information on NICE and the role of a Technology Appraisal Guidance